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Why are foodways important?

Foodways is the study of what people eat and why. Why we procure, prepare and serve the food we do has cultural, sociological, geographical, financial and political influences.

 

 

Why is recognition of diverse foodways valuable?

Preserving our past and present for the future by research, documentation and oral histories. It is culinary anthropology on the hoof, paw, root and leaf.

 

 

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South Dakota State Fair, 2013

 

Greater Midwest Foodways Alliance

FAMILY HEIRLOOM RECIPES

 

South Dakota State Fair

September 1, 2013

 

Contestant

 

 

White Nut Cake

White Nut Cake (Image by Catherine Lambrecht)

 

 

 

White Nut Cake

Joan Antonen, Arlington, South Dakota

 

 

The recipe I have chosen is from my husband's maternal grandmother. This white nut cake goes back as far as my husband and his sister can remember. Grandma, Rosine (Rose) Oldenkamp always made it for special occasions.

 

Grandma Rose was born in Minnesota in 1889 and married Albert Oldenkamp in 1909 and moved to South Dakota. They were married 59 years. She passed away in 1974 at the age of 85.

 

She left quite a collection of recipes. Having raised 4 children and married to a farmer, she put her cooking skills to work. She never wasted anything.

 

The dishes used in my display also were hers. We have used them for family dinners.

 

We do not know where she got the recipe, but she used it often. A good hostess always had something like the cake handy when family or friends stopped by for a visit. The nuts in the cake were a special treat. She always frosted it with her favorite 7 minute frosting.

 

 

White Nut Cake

Joan Antonen, Arlington, South Dakota

 

 

1/2 cup shortening

1 1/3 cup sugar

1 cup milk

3 egg whites

2 1/4. cups cake flour

4 tsp. baking powder

1/4. tsp salt

Chopped walnuts.

 

Mix shortening and sugar. Sift together dry ingredients. Add to sugar and shortening alternately with milk. Add nutmeats. Beat egg whites stiff and fold in batter last.

 

Bake in 2 - 8" round pans that have been greased. Bake at 350 degrees until a toothpick comes out clean, about 25 minutes.

 

 

Seven-minute Frosting

 

2 unbeaten egg whites

1 1/2 cups sugar

1/4. tsp. cream of tartar

1/3 cup cold water

1 tsp. vanilla

 

Place all ingredients except vanilla in top of double boiler (not over heat); beat 1 minute to blend. Place over boiling water and cook, beating constantly, till frosting forms stiff peaks, about 7 minutes. Do not overcook. Remove from boiling water. Add vanilla, beat till spreading consistency about 2 minutes. Frost between layers, then the top and sides.

 

 

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