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Why are foodways important?

Foodways is the study of what people eat and why. Why we procure, prepare and serve the food we do has cultural, sociological, geographical, financial and political influences.

 

 

Why is recognition of diverse foodways valuable?

Preserving our past and present for the future by research, documentation and oral histories. It is culinary anthropology on the hoof, paw, root and leaf.

 

 

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2nd Prize, Missouri State Fair, 2016

 

Greater Midwest Foodways Alliance

 

 

FAMILY HEIRLOOM RECIPES

 


Missouri State Fair

August 13, 2016

 

 

Missouri State Fair 2nd Winner 2016 Angel Pudding Family Heirloom Contest

(Image by Peter Engler)

 

 

Second Prize:

Angel Pudding

Faye Hunton, Sedalia, Missouri

 

 

Angel Pudding, the name sounds kind of heavenly. According to the Hunton family for the past five generations it is.

My first taste of Angel Pudding was at a family dinner shortly after my husband and I were married. His nieces and nephew, who were children, went through the line first and took very large servings of Angel Pudding.

I asked what was special about this dish that children would take such a large serving. I was able to get a small serving and then I got the message. It was heavenly on the taste buds.

My sister-in-law explained that the recipe was a family favorite made by our mother-in-law. She died a year before I became part of the family. I nerver got to eat her cooking, but many of her recipes have been kept alive by the family. Before my father-in-law passed away, he gave me my mother-in-Iaw's recipe box. The box includes the original recipe in her hand writing and I have it on display today. It has no oven temperature or length of time to bake. My sister-in-law supplied that information for me. My mother-in-law wrote to add dates and nuts to the batter, but noted that she always omitted them. However, I have tried the recipe with the dates and nuts and it is equally delicious.

The Angel Pudding is typicaly a dish made for family dinners when there is a crowd as it makes a large quanity. The pink bowl I have served it in today is the original "Angel Pudding Bowl," that my mother-in-law used. My husband and I inherited the "Angel Pudding Bowl" when my father-in­law passed away.

 

Angel Pudding remains a true family favorite. I am doing my part to keep the tradition alive by making Angel Pudding for our grandchildren.

 

 

Second Prize:

Angel Pudding

Faye Hunton, Sedalia, Missouri

 

 

2 eggs, beaten

1 cup white sugar

4 Tablespoons all-purpose flour

1 teaspoon baking powder

1 teaspoon vanila

1 pound large marshmellows, cut into fourths

1 pint heavy cream

 

Preheat oven to 325 degrees F.

Add sugar to beaten eggs and beat well. Add flour, baking powder and vanilla. Mix until smooth.

Pour onto a greased cookie sheet and bake 15-20 minutes unti browned. Remove from cookie sheet while hot as it will stick when cooled. Crumble into small pieces.

Whip cream and add marshmellows and crumbles a few hours before serving.

Store in refrigerator until serving time.

 

10 servings